Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-3 of 3

Know Your Style: Country French Style

by Melissa Dierks

26 March, 2014

Country French Style HomesOriginally called French Provincial, Country French Style evokes the casual simplicity and rustic elements of a country home in the South of France. By paying tribute the region’s sunny, warm landscape, Country French style adds cheerful vitality to a home’s design.

Typical elements in a Country French style home include high-pitched hipped rooflines, symmetrical multi-paned, divided light windows and French doors. Additional elements may include rounded turrets, multiple rooflines and doorways inset into stone or brick archways.

Exterior finishes in Country French style homes include brick, stone and stucco. Different areas of the country utilize different exterior, typically to withstand the weather elements in that locale, so finding a brick Country French home in Texas is more likely than in Southern California where stucco predominates.

French Country décor is an easy blend of rustic, primitive and Old World textures and patterns with soft hues and bright accents. Drawing from nature, Country French base colors include the saturated spectrum of burgundies, wines and terra cottas as well as more delicate pastels drawn from the lavender, sage and buttery yellow-toned field flowers of the Provincial district.

Brightly printed cottons and French toile (pronounced twäl) prints dominate the look and can enhance your décor by the simple addition of cheery curtains, pillows and seat covers. Toile designs include depictions of the agricultural, pastoral, hunting, military or farm-life settings, floralscapes or a mixture of pastorals, florals and stripes. Historically, toile fabric is rougher, homespun muslin, but modern toile prints are available in an array of easy care blends and finishes.

Country French furniture is not one period, but represents an eclectic mixture of furnishings from 18th-century designs inspired by the great halls of Versailles, rough-hewn, practical pieces of less ornate, sturdier composition, and wrought iron. Finishes include lime-washed pastels, unpolished natural woods and stenciled designs.

Mixing styles, eras, patterns and colors makes Country French decorating easy and fun. Charming accessories such as mixed-media candlestick holders, birdcages, stacked books and earthen bowls piled high with fruit complete the relaxed look.

Call or click here to connect with a local agent to help you find your own Country French style home.

How to Survive Transition

by Melissa Dierks

26 March, 2014

How to Survive TransitionTiming the closing of your new home purchase with the end of your lease agreement or sale of your existing home is tricky, to say the least. Rarely does it work out that you move directly from one home to another on a perfect schedule. During the transition, you need a place to live and stash your stuff. In addition, you need the flexibility to move at a moment’s notice — all while living, working, attending school, or running a business. Here are a few tips that might smooth the transition.

Take Care of Your Mail:

As soon as you know that there will be a break between leaving one home and moving into the other, move as many bills, bank statements and important communications to online bill pay as possible. Don’t risk having your important mail delivered to an empty house. For those items not receivable online, and especially if you receive business mail at home consider changing your address to that of a trusted family member. If that’s not possible, rent a mailbox. Both the US Postal Service and private mailbox providers like the UPS Store offer personal and business mailboxes along with other services. Private mailbox services can sign for deliveries and notify you when you receive packages. If your transition period is short, the USPS will hold your mail for several weeks.

Pack with Transition in Mind:

Usually when you move, you pack up the whole house, then load the moving van like a Jenga game—filling every inch of open space—expecting to unload the whole thing within a day or so at your new home. When you have a transition, however, you need to pack items to store, leaving out the things you’ll need to use during those days, weeks, or even months between one place and another. Of course, you can’t plan for every contingency—weather changes, a child’s school project, an unplanned business trip—but you can mitigate some of the inconvenience by keeping some items accessible. One option is to rent a storage unit, placing furniture and other large items in the back, but keeping dressers or storage boxes with seasonal clothing, school and craft supplies, and travel items within reach of the doorway.

Temporarily Suspend Services:

Take the time to contact service providers such as Internet, cable or satellite, electricity and natural gas, newspaper, and landline phones to see if they offer options for suspending services until you transfer them to your new home. Some offer moving suspensions, while others have vacation holds for a small monthly fee.

Where to Live?

If your transition will last just a few weeks, you might consider accepting the hospitality of family or friends. If you work from home, have children, or just require your own space and privacy, however, there are other options.

  • Residential and extended-stay hotels offer weekly and monthly rental options. Most have kitchens complete with dishes and cookware, apartment-sized refrigerators, access to laundry facilities, and weekly cleaning and linen services. Many also offer full hotel services as well. Many extended-stay hotels accommodate pets.
  • Corporate housing or corporate apartments refer to apartment complexes offering short-term leases. Similar to residential hotels, but typically larger — with as many as three bedrooms — corporate housing caters to business people and families needing more space than a hotel room provides.
  • Families with children might consider a more adventuresome stay at a nearby resort or campground that offers cabins, vacation cottages or lodges. A move in the off-season may make this option both affordable and fun. Be sure to factor in the extra drive time to work or school, but take advantage of nearby sightseeing and holiday amenities for some extra fun during your transition.
  • Borrow or rent an RV. Whether your move is across town, across the state or across the country, consider renting a recreational vehicle. With many RV parks located inside or near city limits, temporarily living in an RV park has many of the same advantages as a hotel. If you are moving some distance and can take vacation time during your transition, a one-way RV rental could be the solution for you. Similar to a one-way moving van rental, you pick up the RV near your current location, and when done, deliver it to a location near your final destination.

As with all your transition needs, your professional real estate agent can provide you with relocation options and ideas to make your move as smooth as possible.

Condo? Co-Op? Apartment? Townhome?

by Melissa Dierks

26 March, 2014

 housing categoryWhich is which?

Although all are part of the common-interest housing category, condos, co-ops, townhouses, and apartments may mean different things to different buyers, so here is a breakdown of what each word means and the advantages or disadvantages of one over another for the homebuyer.

First, let’s get the low-down on what makes up the common-interest housing real estate category. Common-interest housing is composed of areas owned individually and areas shared by all owners. The shared or common areas typically include landscaping, pools, parking, and clubhouses, but may also include exteriors, fences, and roofs of certain types of properties. Any community development that has shared property, including individually separate homes in developments with shared playgrounds and pools, falls into this category. Often, a management service or homeowners’ association manages the common areas.

Specifically, a condo—or more properly, a condominium—is a single housing unit within the shared property owned by the homeowner. This may be a unit in a tower building (also called an apartment) or a conjoined house with its own ground floor exterior entry (often called a townhouse, although a townhouse is not always a condominium), a single family home or a mobile home in a planned community. The term “condominium” is a legal term in the United States and so is governed by laws of real estate ownership.

In a condominium-style common-interest development (CID), the homeowner owns the interior space of the property independent of the other units and may buy or sell the real estate property as the sole owner of that specific unit.

A co-op—or cooperative housing development—differs in that “owners” own shares in the corporation that owns the real estate development rather than owning an actual unit. Each shareholder has a vote in the real estate corporation and share ownership authorizes the occupancy of a specific unit. Typically, shareholders pay a “share” of the monthly expenses of the real estate corporation. As with a condominium, cooperatives may be apartment-style units in a single building, townhomes or patio homes, single family homes, or even mobile homes. The legal term “cooperative” refers to the real estate ownership structure rather than the property type.

So, what is an apartment? Or a townhouse?

A townhome is a style of house connected on at least one side of the structure to another house. It may be individually owned real estate or part of a CID. A true townhome will have independent sidewalls even though they may touch the walls of another townhome. That being said, many condominium, cooperative, and rental unit designs mimic townhomes, with individual groundfloor entries, back patios or yards, and even differing faces and rooflines. These units may share a wall or roof, however, as part of a single structure.

An apartment is another matter. In common usage, “apartment” is a rental unit rather than privately owned real estate. The person occupying the unit does not own it, but leases it from the owner of the entire real estate development. But in legal terms, an apartment is a part of a residential structure occupied by one housing unit (family, roommates, etc.). An apartment, then, can be a rental, but it may also be a condominium unit (homeowner owns the interior space and shares the other spaces) or a cooperative unit (owner owns shares of the entire development equal to the unit being occupied).

Consult your real estate professional to see which type of CID is the best fit for your circumstances in your local real estate market.

Displaying blog entries 1-3 of 3

Contact Information

Photo of The Regal Team Real Estate
Melissa Dierks
The Regal Team of RE/MAX Professionals
7111 W Bell Road, Suite 101,
Glendale AZ 85308
Direct: (623)229-0154
Office: (623)643-1092
Fax: (623)201-7562

Melissa Dierks - Agent with RE/MAX ProfessionalsMelissa Dierks - Agent with RE/MAX PROFESSIONALS

Melissa Dierks reviewsMelissa Dierks reviewsMelissa Dierks on ZillowMelissa Dierks on Zillow